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Embracing Motherhood How to Make Soaked Steel Cut Oats

How to Make Soaked Steel Cut Oats

If you’re looking for a breakfast alternative to commercially processed cereal, steel cut oats are a great alternative! I buy organic steel cut oats in bulk from Country Life Natural Foods, and with 7 g of protein and 10% of our daily recommend iron per serving, they are a healthy and economical breakfast choice that the whole family enjoys. When you top them with butter, you’re getting plenty of healthy fats. They do have a considerable amount of phytic acid that prevents us from absorbing necessary minerals, so that’s why I recommend soaking them first.

Ingredients

  • 2 c. Organic Steel Cut Oats (I buy mine here, but you can get a smaller amount here.)
  • 2 T. Apple Cider Vinegar (I buy mine here, but you can get some here too.)
  • Filtered Water
  • 4 Quart Pot
  • Butter
  • Real Salt (I buy mine here, but you can get some here too.)

Directions

  1. Place the steel cut oats in a pot and cover with about twice as much water.
  2. Add the apple cider vinegar.

    soaking oats

    Adding Apple Cider Vinegar

  3. Let sit overnight or for 8 hours minimum. The ideal would be to soak for a complete 24 hours to get rid of all of the phytic acid, but anything is better than nothing.
  4. Bring to a slow boil stirring often.
  5. Once it boils, turn off the burner off, cover with a lid, and let it sit until all of the water is absorbed (about 20 minutes).
  6. *If it’s really hard to stir, add more water. If it’s still really soupy, turn the burner on low and leave the lid off, and cook until more of the water evaporates/is absorbed.
  7. Serve with butter and salt. Sometimes we like to add brown sugar and milk for a sweet treat.
Steel Cut Oats with Butter and Salt

Steel Cut Oats with Butter and Salt

How to Make Healthy Granola Cereal and Why Commercially Processed Cereal is So Bad

How to Make Healthy Granola Cereal

This homemade cereal, using organic rolled oats, is a great alternative to commercially processed cereal. (Check out my other blog here about why commercially processed cereals are so bad.) Not only that, but this was ridiculously easy to make and an instant success in this household! My daughter Ruby LOVES this cereal and begs me to make it when we run out. My son, who can be a picky eater (and by “picky” I mean he’ll only eat like six things: chicken, salmon, bacon, pecans, apples, and my homemade fries) has recently had a really sore throat and it’s been a battle to get him to eat anything. Well, after making this cereal, he reluctantly tried one bite, and then devoured the entire bowl! I will be making this recipe quite often I imagine! Oh yeah, I’m on my second bowl right now.

Ingredients

  • 3 c. Organic Rolled Oats (Get some here.)
  • ½ c. Butter (1 stick)
  • ½ c. Brown Sugar or Maple Syrup (You can use either one or a combination of both. I personally think the brown sugar tastes better, but the maple syrup is healthier. Grade B maple syrup is full of antioxidants and naturally occurring minerals like thiamine, calcium, and zinc. Get some here.)
  • 1 T. Vanilla Extract
  • 1 T. Cinnamon
  • ½ t. Real Salt (Get some here.)
  • *Optional: Raisins, Almonds, Pecans, Cranberries, Craisins, or anything else “granola-y” that you think would taste good

Directions

  1. Preheat the over to 400ºF.
  2. Heat up the butter on the stove (or if you’re in a pinch, just microwave it).
  3. Add the maple syrup, brown sugar, vanilla, cinnamon, and salt and stir.

    Heat until just bubbling.

    Melted Butter, Maple Syrup, Vanilla, and Cinnamon

  4. Spread out the oats in a glass baking pan. (Sometimes, I just add my dry ingredients to the oats and mix them with my fingers.)

    Organic Rolled Oats in a Glass Baking Pan

    Organic Rolled Oats in a Glass Baking Pan

  5. Pour the butter mixture on top of the oats, and gently mix together until all of the oats are coated.
  6. If you want to, you can add some raisins, cranberries, craisins, or any nuts at this point.
  7. Bake for 20 minutes. (Try to stir the oats up about halfway through if you can remember.)
  8. Let it cool.

    Baked Oats Cooling

    Baked Oats Cooling

  9. Put into a bowl and pour milk over it, just like you would any other cereal. Or you can mix with some plain or vanilla yogurt for a really yummy treat!

*Note: Since this cereal is so good, I tried making a double recipe, but it just turned out awful. The oats were too chewy instead of nice and crispy even though I stirred it a bunch of times. I even tried using 4 cups of oats, but it just didn’t turn out as good as the 3 cups. So don’t mess around with this recipe!

*If you’re really digging these rolled oats, you should also check out my yummy recipe for Healthy Oatmeal Cookies.

How to Make the World’s Best Yogurt and Buttermilk Pancakes

I stumbled across the recipe for these yogurt and buttermilk pancakes this morning purely by accident when I ran out of my intended ingredients, and the results have absolutely blown me away. These are the best pancakes I have ever made. Period. It isn’t even dinnertime yet and the entire batch has been devoured by everyone in the family. Now, let me share the brilliant story of their creation.

It all started when I woke up this fine Saturday morning with my precious little five month old who decided that 5:30 a.m. would be a fine time to start the day. While everyone else slept in and Julian played happily in his bouncy seat, I decided that I would waft the house with the delicious aroma of a pancake breakfast and fresh coffee.

After I had added two cups of flour to my bowl, hoping to next add the milk and my cup of sourdough starter for my Sort of Sourdough Pancakes, I realized that we were out of milk. “Rats!” I thought, as I slowly remembered that I knew that we were out of milk since it was milk day and we had plans to visit the farm and get our weekly eight gallons of fresh raw milk when everyone woke up. Come on brain!

As I scanned the fridge, I found one cup of buttermilk left over from making my Ranch Dressing. “Hmmmm, buttermilk pancakes sound good,” I thought. But after adding the one cup of buttermilk to my flour, I realized it wasn’t near enough liquid. So I scanned the fridge again and noticed some plain organic yogurt sitting way in the back. “I sure hope this isn’t rotten,” I thought, not remembering the last time I had even touched the stuff. “Phew!” it passed the smell test, and into the mixture it went!

Next, I had hoped to add 3 or 4 eggs to at least make some super protein pancakes that Scott and I could force down, but we only had one egg. So after adding it to the mixture, I only half-heartedly mixed in the rest of the ingredients (vanilla, cinnamon, aluminum free baking powder, and salt). I had pretty much accepted the fact that this recipe was a bust, and I was ready to toss the whole thing out. But after mixing everything together, I realized that, hey, it wasn’t half bad. “Maybe there’s hope!” I exclaimed to Julian who just looked at me with a big goofy grin.

So I heated up the skillet with some coconut oil and decided to give these my best shot. I spent the next hour cooking one pancake after another (they took a reeeeeeeeeeally long time to cook thanks to the yogurt) until I had one big stack of pancakes. I usually take pictures of just about everything I cook since I like to blog about my recipes, but I didn’t even think it was worth it to snap one single photo.

After all of my pancakes were complete, I finally decided to try one. I was prepared for the worst as I hesitantly lifted up one corner of a still warm pancake and took a little nibble. It was…good. I mean, wow, like, really good, and it didn’t even have any butter or syrup on it yet! So I smothered one with butter, cut it up into bite sized pieces (cuz that’s what you do when you’re a mom, even if there aren’t any kids around), and drizzled some fresh maple syrup on top. Then I poured a big glass of milk, and sat down to one of the best pancakes I have ever had in my life.

The texture was just so amazing. It was chewy and moist, and full of so much wonderful flavor. The way that the buttermilk and yogurt complemented each other, and how the vanilla and cinnamon accented this taste explosion was simply exquisite. When my husband and children finally awoke, they were all treated to the most amazing breakfast ever. Everyone devoured these pancakes for breakfast, and then we ate them again for lunch! I am happy (and sad) to say that they are now all gone!

We only go shopping every other week nowadays to help with our time and budget, so we’ll have to wait awhile to stock up on buttermilk and organic plain yogurt again, but you can bet your buttons that this will be a recipe I will make time and time again. Now, without further adieu, here’s the recipe.

Ingredients

  • 1 c. Buttermilk
  • 1 ½ – 2 c. Plain Yogurt
  • 2 c. Flour
  • 1 Egg
  • 1 T. Cinnamon
  • 1 T. Vanilla Extract
  • ½ t. Real Salt
  • 1 t. Aluminum Free Baking Powder

Directions

  1. Preheat your cast iron skillet at heat level of 3 (if that’s how you’re cooking) and plop in a huge dollop of coconut oil.
  2. Mix together the flour, buttermilk, and yogurt. The mixture shouldn’t be too thick, but it shouldn’t be runny either.
  3. Crack the egg and mix it in.
  4. Then add the cinnamon, vanilla, salt, and baking powder, and gently mix everything together.
  5. Turn the heat up to a 4, and pour in a ladle’s worth of batter.
  6. Cover and cook for about 10-12 minutes.
  7. Check to see when not just the edges, but the entire pancake starts to look a darker shade of brown and you can see little bubbles popping up before flipping.
  8. Cover and cook for another minute or two. If you don’t cook these pancakes long enough, they will feel gooey in the middle. As they cool, they will firm up a bit.
  9. This recipe should make about 6 medium sized pancakes.
  10. Top with tons of butter, drizzle on some fresh maple syrup, and sit down at a real table with a big glass of milk to enjoy the best pancake you’ve ever had.
  11. You’re welcome.
yogurt_and_buttermilk_pancake_partly_cut_up_with_butter_and_syrup

Yogurt and Buttermilk Pancake

ruby_eating_yogurt_and_buttermilk_pancakes

Yogurt and Buttermilk Pancake Lunch

 

 

 

Sort of Sourdough Pancakes

Typically, when you make things with sourdough, you need to prepare them well in advance, but what if you wake up one Sunday morning and you’re just craving pancakes? This is a good recipe to make some quick pancakes that are “sort of sourdough”. (If you’re looking for more of a real deal sourdough waffle/pancake recipe, check this recipe out, and if you just want some whole wheat pancakes, go here.) My kids always love this pancake recipe, and we sometimes even eat them for dinner!

Read my article about phytic acid if you want to learn why eating sourdough is so important!

Ingredients

  • 1 c. Sourdough Starter
  • 2. c. Milk (Raw is best.)
  • 2 c. Flour (I get my wheat berries here, but you can find some similar here too. I use this grinder. You could also just buy some organic sprouted grain flour here.)
  • 3 Eggs (Preferably pastured)
  • 6 T. (¾ stick) Melted Butter (You can add room temperature butter and it should mix alright though.)
  • 2 T. Cinnamon (Buy some here.)
  • 2 T. Vanilla Extract (This vanilla would be best, but on our budget, I buy this.)
  • ½ t. Real Salt (I buy my Real Salt in bulk here, you can buy a shaker here, or a refill pouch here.)
  • 1 t. Baking Soda (or Aluminum Free Baking Powder)
  • 2 T. Coconut Oil (This coconut oil would be best, but on our budget, I buy this.)

Directions

  1. Mix the sourdough starter and milk. Try to let it sit out for as long as you can. If you let it sit out for 8 hours, all of the phytic acid will be broken down, but if you can at least let it sit out for half an hour to an hour it will be better than nothing. (*Eating sourdough is an acquired taste. It might be a good idea to slowly get your family used to the sour taste of these pancakes by letting the batter sit out for increasing amounts of time.)
  2. Preheat your cast iron skillet (make sure it’s cured properly) by setting it to a 2 or 3 for about five minutes.
  3. Add a dollop of coconut oil to your cast iron skillet (or whatever cooking pan you choose).
  4. In a separate bowl, mix the eggs.
  5. Add the cinnamon, vanilla, salt, and baking soda. Stir well.
  6. Add the flour and mix together. Add about a ½ c. to a cup more flour if you like poofier pancakes. This mixture is pretty thin, but it makes some deliciously thin pancakes that we all love. (*I find that my kids really like it when I cook pancakes one way for awhile, that I mix it up and make it a little different. So I’ll go from thick to thin and less sour to more sour quite often.)

    sourdough pancake batter mixed up and ready to serve with a ladle

    Sort of Sourdough Batter

  7. Turn the heat dial to 4 and pour a ladle’s worth of batter into the skillet. (The oil should be bubbling around the pancake.)

    sort of sourdough batter just starting to cook on a cast iron skillet

    Sort of Sourdough Batter Starting to Cook

  8. Cover and let cook for about 2-4 minutes.  (By the time I get a few pancakes in, the heat is sometimes too high and needs to be turned down temporarily. You’ll know if the heat is too high if you get hit with splattering coconut oil!)
  9. When the edges are slightly browned and the top is bubbly, you’ll know it’s time to flip.  (Stand back as you do this so you don’t get hit with splattering coconut oil.)

    Sort of sourdough pancake with brown edges and bubbling on top ready to flip

    Sort of Sourdough Pancake Ready to Flip

  10. Cover and cook for about 1 minute on the other side.

    sort of sourdough pancake cooking in a cast iron skillet

    Sort of Sourdough Pancake Almost Done Cooking

  11. Cook the rest of pancakes and add more coconut oil as needed. When you rock the pan back and forth, there should be enough oil to generously coat the bottom. This batter should make about 5-6 pancakes.
  12. Serve with butter and maple syrup. (I like to smear the butter all over the top, then cut it up, and finally add a very modest amount of syrup.)
    sourdough pancake fully cooked with a dollop of butter on the top

    Sort of Sourdough Pancake

    cut up sourdough pancake with butter and syrup ready to eat on a plate

    Sort of Sourdough Pancake Cut Up and Ready to Eat

fried eggs cooked in a cast iron skillet

How to Make the Perfect Fried Egg

There are so many different types of egg dishes to consider making, but my each of my four kids have gone through a phase when one of their favorite foods was a perfectly cooked fried egg. Just like all of my other egg recipes, this one is simple and easy to follow, and will soon become a family favorite in your home too.

Ingredients

  • 3-4 Eggs (Preferably Pastured)
  • 1 T. Coconut Oil
  • ½ t. Salt (I buy my Real Salt in bulk here. You can buy a shaker here, or a refill pouch here.)
  • ¼ t. Pepper
  • 1 T. Butter
  • ½ c. Cheese (Optional)

Directions

  1. Cure the Cast Iron Skillet: If you’re using a cast iron skillet, which I recommend, then you’ll want to make sure it’s cured properly before beginning.
  2. Coconut Oil: Plop in a dollop of coconut oil and let the pan warm up for a good 3-5 minutes on a low setting. (This helps to ensure that the skillet is properly cured even more.)

    Coconut oil melting on a cast iron skillet

    Coconut Oil Melting on a Cast Iron Skillet

  3. Turn Up the Heat: Turn the heat up to a 3 or 4 and if you have the patience, let it heat up for another few minutes.
  4. Crack the Eggs: I usually like to cook three or four eggs at a time.

    fried eggs just starting to cook in a cast iron skillet

    Fried Eggs Just Hit the Cast Iron Skillet

  5. Break the Yolks: Puncture the yolks by making an X in them with the spatula. (Don’t get too crazy here, you want the white and yellow parts of the egg to stay somewhat separate.)
    fried eggs halfway cooked with yolks broken

    Fried Eggs with Broken Yolks

     

  6. Cover and Cook: Cover the pan with a lid and cook on a 3 for about 8 minutes. Check the eggs after about 4 minutes. If they’re not really cooking yet, turn it up a bit. If the oil is bubbling and the eggs are cooking too fast, turn it down.)

    Fried eggs covered and cooking.

    Fried Eggs Covered and Cooking

  7. Flip: Once the eggs are cooked almost all the way through, it’s time to flip.
    fried eggs ready to flip in a cast iron skillet

    Fried Eggs Ready to Flip

    fried eggs cooked and flipped in a cast iron skillet

    Fried Eggs Flipped

  8. Cheese: If you want cheese, add it now. Either shredded or sliced will work just fine.
  9. Cover and Turn Off the Heat: Let the eggs finish cooking for a minute or two, or wait until the cheese melts.

    cooked fried eggs with melted cheese in a cast iron skillet

    Fried Eggs with Cheese

  10. Serve: If I’m serving the eggs plain without any cheese, I like to add a large pat of butter. Then I cut the eggs up into bite size pieces and serve. These eggs also work really well in egg sandwiches.
    cooked fried eggs with melted cheese and bacon on a plate

    Cooked Fried Eggs with Cheese Served with Bacon

    One Egg with Melted Cheese Cut Up and Ready to Eat!

    One Egg with Melted Cheese Cut Up and Ready to Eat!

perfectly cooked sunny side up eggs with sourdough muffins

How to Cook the Perfect Sunny Side Up Eggs

Frying an egg might seem like the simplest of culinary feats, but it can also be one of the most challenging..especially if you want to cook an egg just perfectly so that the white part is completely cooked and the yolk is nice and dippy. For years and years, I would proclaim to my husband that we were having sunny side up eggs for breakfast, only to serve them over medium time and time again. But I have FINALLY figured out how to cook the PERFECT  sunny side up egg. Every. Single. Time.

Ingredients

  • 3-4 Eggs (Preferably pastured)
  • 1 T. Olive Oil
  • 1 T. Coconut Oil
  • 1 t. Real Salt (I buy my Real Salt in bulk here. You can buy a shaker here, or a refill pouch here.)
  • ½ t. Pepper
  • Sourdough Muffins
  • 1 T. Butter

Directions

  1. Cure the Cast Iron Skillet: If you are cooking with a cast iron skillet (which I recommend for pretty much everything), then you’ll want to make sure it’s properly cured before you begin. Even if it’s been cured recently, I recommend running some hot water over it to clean out any bits of food, pouring in a fresh glug of olive oil, and letting it sit at the lowest setting on your stove for about thirty minutes to an hour.
  2. Coconut Oil (or Butter): Add a dollop of coconut oil and turn the heat up to a 3 or 4 for a few minutes.

    Coconut Oil Melting on a Cast Iron Skillet

    Coconut Oil Melting on a Cast Iron Skillet

  3. Add the Eggs: Make sure the coconut oil is melted and the pan has had plenty of time to heat up (a few minutes at least), and then crack the eggs into the pan.

    three sunny side up eggs just starting to cook in a cast iron skillet

    Sunny Side Up Eggs Just Starting to Cook

  4. Cook Low and Slow: The trick with just about every egg dish is to cook them at a low temperature for a long time. Resist the temptation to turn the heat up because you’ll turn your back for ONE SECOND and the eggs will be overcooked. You’ll want to cook them for about ten minutes or so. If the eggs are just not cooking after some time, turn the heat up just a titch, and if the oil is starting to bubble, turn the heat down a smidgen. DON’T COVER WITH A LID! You might think that it will help cook the tops, but it won’t. It will just overcook the eggs.

    three sunny side up eggs cooked halfway through on a cast iron skillet

    Sunny Side Up Eggs Halfway Cooked

  5. Add the Salt and Pepper: At any point after you’ve cracked the eggs, go ahead and sprinkle on some salt and pepper.

    three sunny side up eggs almost ready to flip on a cast iron skillet

    Sunny Side Up Eggs Sprinkled with Salt and Pepper

  6. Time to Flip: Once the eggs are cooked just about all the way through, they are ready to be flipped.
    three sunny side up eggs being flipped in a cast iron skillet

    These Sunny Side Up Eggs are Ready to Flip

    IMG_8429

  7. Keep it Quick: To make a truly perfect dippy egg, you’ll only want to keep the egg flipped for no more than ten seconds. If you keep it flipped for about 30-40 seconds, you’ll notice that the egg is still dippy, but more firm around the edges. Any longer, and you’ve ruined the whole thing, and you might as well start over. Just make sure the whites are cooked through all the way because it’s really gross when they’re not.
    showing how sunny side up eggs only need to stay flipped for a very short time

    Sunny Side Up Eggs Cooked to Perfection

    In the picture above, the egg with the fork next to it was flipped for about 45 seconds, the egg in the middle was flipped for about 30 seconds, and the egg on the right was only flipped for about 5 seconds.

  8. Check the Pan: You’ll know if your cast iron skillet was cured properly (and that you didn’t cook the eggs at too high of a temperature) if your pan looks like this when you are done.

    after cooking sunny side up eggs this cast iron skillet still looks clean

    Cast Iron Skillet After Cooking Sunny Side Up Eggs

  9. Enjoy: Serve with some toasted and buttered sourdough muffins, a few slices of bacon, and a tall glass of milk for an amazing breakfast! (Also, make sure to sprinkle those yolks with a generous helping of Real Salt!)

    three sunny side up eggs, sourdough muffin, bacon, and milk make the perfect breakfast

    Sunny Side Up Eggs, Sourdough Muffin, Bacon, and Milk…the Perfect Breakfast!

Embracing Motherhood How to Make the Best Egg Sandwiches

How to Make the Best Egg Sandwiches

Egg sandwiches are a delicious and portable breakfast that you can take anywhere! I love making a pile of egg sandwiches in the morning and then enjoy watching them disappear throughout the day. My husband enjoys intermittent fasting and so he pops home around mid-day and can grab one without any fuss, and my daughter enjoys eating one for her after school snack. Sometimes I get so busy in my mornings that I forget to eat, but if there’s a pile of egg sandwiches, I have no excuse!

Ingredients

  • 4 Eggs (Preferably pastured)
  • ¼ c. Raw Milk
  • Real Salt (I buy my Real Salt in bulk here, you can buy a shaker here, or a refill pouch here.)
  • Pepper
  • ¼ c. Cheddar Cheese (Shredded or sliced)
  • Sourdough Muffins
  • 2 t. Butter

Directions

There are two ways to make egg sandwiches. 1) You can use scrambled eggs, which can be a little more difficult to balance the on the muffin, but they are oh so light, fluffy, and delicious! 2) Or you can use fried eggs which pack up a little better and give you that “Egg McMuffin” taste that you might crave from time to time.

Scrambled Egg Sandwich

  1. Cook the Perfect Scrambled Eggs: Check out my recipe for how to make the perfect scrambled eggs every time using a perfectly cured cast iron skillet.
  2. Melt the Cheese: Once your eggs have been cooked to perfection, I like to first top them with a large pat of butter, stir and melt it around, then add a fresh sprinkling of salt, and finally add shredded cheese. Cover, turn off the heat, and let it melt.
  3. Put Eggs on the Sourdough Muffin: Check out my sourdough muffin recipe to see how to make some delicious “English Muffins” that free from phytic acid and taste great! Scoop out a generous amount of eggs onto the buttered muffin and press the top down.
scrambled egg sandwich with melted cheese on a sourdough muffin

Scrambled Egg Sandwich

 

Fried Egg Sandwich

  1. Cook the Perfect Fried Eggs: Check out my recipe for how to make the perfect fried eggs every time using a perfectly cured cast iron skillet.
  2. Melt the Cheese: Once your eggs have been cooked to perfection, I like to first top them with a large pat of butter, stir and melt it around, then add a fresh sprinkling of salt, and finally add shredded cheese. Cover, turn off the heat, and let it melt.
  3. Cut and Fold the Eggs: Once you separate the eggs into individual servings, you’ll want to fold them in half so that they’ll fit more easily on the muffin. I like to cut off the little triangle piece so that it’s the best fit. Then I take the little triangles, cut them up a little more, and serve them on the side.

    fried eggs with melted cheese folded and cut for an egg sandwich

    Fried Eggs Folded In Half and Cut to Fit on an Egg Sandwich

  4. Put Eggs on the Sourdough Muffin: Check out my sourdough muffin recipe to see how to make some delicious “English Muffins” that free from phytic acid and taste great! Scoop out a generous amount of eggs onto the buttered muffin and press the top down.

    fried egg sandwich with melted cheese on a sourdough muffin

    Fried Egg Sandwich

 

Variations: There are plenty of other toppings that you can add to make your egg sandwich even better. Here are some of the topping I enjoy adding periodically.

egg sandwich with jalapenos

Egg Sandwich with Jalapeños

  • Crumbled Bacon
  • Fried Lunchmeat
  • Taco Meat
  • Sliced Jalapeños
  • Diced Green Pepper
  • Tomato Slices
  • Fresh Parsley
  • Garlic Slices (As long as I’m not going to talk to anyone who will care about my breath!)
perfect scrambled eggs cooked in a cast iron skillet

How to Make the Best Scrambled Eggs

Scrambled eggs are an absolute staple in our family. I usually cook some kind of eggs every morning. Sometimes I’ll be in the mood for scrambled eggs, but it may be a day for some sunny side up eggs or a baked egg dish. You never know! Anyways, knowing how to make REALLY GOOD scrambled eggs is one of the first lessons a mom chef needs to learn.

Ingredients

  • 4 Eggs (Pastured is best.)
  • ¼ c. Milk (Raw is best.)
  • 1 t. Real Salt (I buy my Real Salt in bulk here. You can buy a shaker here, or a refill pouch here.)
  • ½ t. Pepper
  • 2 T. Butter
  • 1 c. Shredded Cheddar Cheese

Directions

  1. Cure the Cast Iron Skillet: If you are cooking with a cast iron skillet (which I recommend for pretty much everything), then you’ll want to make sure it’s properly cured before you begin. Even if it’s been cured recently, I recommend running some hot water over it to clean out any bits of food, pouring in a fresh glug of olive oil, and letting it sit at the lowest setting on your stove for about thirty minutes to an hour.
  2. Coconut Oil (or Butter): Add a dollop of coconut oil and turn the heat up to a 3 or 4 for a few minutes.

    Coconut Oil Melting on a Cast Iron Skillet

    Coconut Oil Melting on a Cast Iron Skillet

  3. Mix the Eggs: While the pan is preheating, combine the eggs, milk (you can always substitute water if you’re out of milk), salt, and pepper.
    eggs, milk, salt, pepper ready to mix for scrambled eggs

    Eggs, Milk, Salt, and Pepper

    If it suits your fancy, you can add a few other spices like maybe some cayenne pepper, onion powder, of some chives. Get crazy! Mix really well.

    scrambled egg mixture mixed until it's nice and bubbly

    Scrambled Egg Mixture

  4. Add the Eggs: Make sure the coconut oil is melted and the pan has had plenty of time to heat up (a few minutes at least), then pour in the eggs. If the pan sizzles as you add the eggs, you know the temperature is just right. (But don’t worry if it doesn’t, it’s better too cook too low than too high.)
  5. Cover and Cook: The key to making really good scrambled eggs is to cook them at a low temperature and to cook them cook slowly. If you lift up the lid and nothing is going on, turn up the dial a titch. But keep your eye on it, because they can burn quickly!  It’s better to start too low than too high.

    scrambled eggs cooking nice and slow so that they don't burn

    Scrambled Eggs Cooked Halfway Through

  6. Stir: After you can see that the eggs have cooked a considerable amount, start to stir. Start by flipping the eggs over, then chop them up (I prefer semi-big chunks) as you move them around. Just don’t over stir, you’ll make the pieces too small and they’ll lose their softness.

    IMG_8723

    Cooked Scrambled Eggs

  7. Add Butter: Add a big chunk of butter, let it melt, then stir it around to mix it in.

    cooked scrambled eggs with melting butter in a cast iron skillet

    Scrambled Eggs with Butter

  8. Add More Salt: This is when I like to add a fresh sprinkling of salt.

    cooked scrambled eggs with butter and salt in a cast iron skillet

    Scrambled Eggs with Butter and Salt

  9. Add Cheese: Sprinkle on some shredded cheese, cover with a lid, and turn the stove off until it melts.
    cooked scrambled eggs with shredded cheese about to melt

    Cooked Scrambled Eggs with Shredded Cheese Ready to Melt

    cooked scrambled eggs with melted cheese in a cast iron skillet

    Cooked Scrambled Eggs with Melted Cheese

  10. Serve: This is another kid favorite in our house!

    cooked scrambled eggs with melted cheese on a plate with a kids fork

    Kid’s Plate with Scrambled Eggs

Sourdough Waffles and Pancakes

These waffles are a BIG hit with my kids! I like to keep one fresh batch in the fridge and one spare batch in the freezer. In either case, I just pull one out, pop it in the toaster, and we’re in business! Then I like to slather it with a generous amount of butter, cut it into bite size pieces, top with some fresh maple syrup (or organic syrup when the budget is tight), and WALLA –breakfast is served! (*Note: Sometimes my kids suddenly turn on me and stop liking what they used to like. When that happens with this, I switch to my Sort of Sourdough Pancake recipe or my Whole Wheat Pancake recipe.)

Ingredients

  • 1 c. Sourdough Starter
  • 2. c. Milk (Raw is best.)
  • 4 c. Flour (Freshly ground for optimal nutrition so that the phytase that will break down phytic acidI get my wheat berries here, but you can find some similar here too.)
  • 2 Eggs (Preferably pastured)
  • 6 T. (¾ stick) Melted Butter (You can add room temperature butter and it should mix alright though.)
  • 2 T. Raw Honey  (You could add ¼ c. brown sugar, or just skip this ingredient – it just helps to counteract the flavor if you’re not used to sour. It’s best to buy local raw honey, but you can buy it here too.)
  • 1 t. Real Salt (I buy my Real Salt in bulk here, you can buy a shaker here, or a refill pouch here.)
  • 1 t. Baking Soda  (or Aluminum Free Baking Powder)
  • 2 T. Cinnamon (Buy some here.)
  • 2 T. Vanilla Extract (This vanilla would be best, but on our budget, I buy this.)
  • 2 T. Coconut Oil (This coconut oil would be best, but on our budget, I buy this.)

IMG_2795Directions

Part 1: The Sponge (Mix and Let Sit Overnight…or for 8 Hours)

  1. Dissolve the sourdough starter into the milk.
  2. Mix in the flour.
  3. Cover and let sit overnight or for 8 hours. (I like to do all of my food prep in the morning, so I make my overnight batter in the morning, then put it in the fridge during the day, and finally put it out on the counter before I go to bed so it’s ready the next morning.)
  4. Note: Now, if you’re like me and you unintentionally leave it out for way more than 8 hours, YOU might still like it, but your picky eaters may not. So watch the time.

Part 2: The Final Batter (The Next Morning…or 8 Hours Later)

IMG_2945

  1. Start preheating your waffle iron.
  2. Add the eggs, butter, cinnamon, vanilla, salt, and baking soda to the overnight mixture. (You can mix all of these ingredients in a separate bowl first if you want.)
  3. I like to use beaters to mix everything together, but you could also use a spoon.
  4. Coat the waffle iron with coconut oil. I just bought this waffle iron, and I love it. (I like my waffles square so that I can pop them in the toaster.)IMG_2946
  5. Cook for about 6 minutes (or until the light turns green). You want them as lightly cooked as possible so that you can reheat them later in the toaster, and they won’t be too overdone. IMG_7895
  6. *This also makes great pancake batter, so if you don’t have a waffle iron, just make pancakes instead.
  7. Smother with butter and maple syrup then serve! (Find out why I like to smother everything with butter here.)IMG_7894

*I adapted this recipe from The Fresh Loaf, which is a great source for all bread making.

Why Eat Sourdough? To learn more about why sourdough is the best way to get rid of phytic acid, check out my blog: Phytic Acid: The Anti-Nutrient That’s Slowly Killing You.